Where to find Free Ebooks – Guest Post

December 11, 2010

(Thank you to Alisa Gilbert for this guest post on a few places to find free Ebooks!)

Places Homeschool Moms Can Find Free eBooks

Some of my favorite tech gadgets of late are eReaders whether it be a Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader or even the super-cool iPad, which serves as an eReader among other purposes. Avid readers can carry around one of these lightweight contraptions capable of holding hundreds of eBooks instead of lugging around tons of books or filling their already overflowing shelves. I also happen to think eReaders are a great tool for a homeschooling mom.

These eReaders can be quite the investment (particularly if you opt for the iPad), so it’s nice to have a few web resources up your sleeve where you can download free eBooks.

    1. Probably one of the best-known resources for free eBooks is Project Gutenberg. The site allows you to search by author or title, and is chock full of excellent classic literature to supplement an at-home English or literature class. The site only offers books with expired copyrights; many of the titles were written by authors who have passed away, so no one’s losing money as a result of you using this site.Of the 33,000 titles you can download here, many are classics you likely have built into your curriculum, such as A Tale of Two Cities, Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol (perfect for the holidays!) by Charles Dickens, Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. For older students, there are more complex works, like Moby Dick, Metamorphosis and War and Peace. You can also find fiction works here other than the classics.

  • You can also do an advanced book search on the newly launched Google Books and download numerous titles in the public domain. All you do is mark that you are searching for titles that are “full view only” and your searches will bring up books that are available for download in their entirety. I found Great Expectations and The Jungle Book here in a casual search.

  • Sony’s eBook store is also a good place to find free eBooks in the public domain.

  • Another good site is Free E-Book, where in my most recent searches I found books like The Red Badge of Courage, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and The Call of the Wild all available for free download.

  • Barnes & Noble also has some titles available for free if you happen to have the Nook. Take a look at the free Nook Books available. You may want to be careful though. A lot of them are harlequin romance novels that probably won’t give your child the right kind of education! There are some useful titles, though, like The Scarlet Letter and Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Enjoy!

By-line:

This guest post is contributed by Alisa Gilbert, who writes on the topics of bachelors degree.

Places Homeschool Moms Can Find Free eBooks

Some of my favorite tech gadgets of late are eReaders whether it be a Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader or even the super-cool iPad, which serves as an eReader among other purposes. Avid readers can carry around one of these lightweight contraptions capable of holding hundreds of eBooks instead of lugging around tons of books or filling their already overflowing shelves. I also happen to think eReaders are a great tool for a homeschooling mom.

These eReaders can be quite the investment (particularly if you opt for the iPad), so it’s nice to have a few web resources up your sleeve where you can download free eBooks.

Probably one of the best-known resources for free eBooks is Project Gutenberg. The site allows you to search by author or title, and is chock full of excellent classic literature to supplement an at-home English or literature class. The site only offers books with expired copyrights; many of the titles were written by authors who have passed away, so no one’s losing money as a result of you using this site.

Of the 33,000 titles you can download here, many are classics you likely have built into your curriculum, such as A Tale of Two Cities, Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol (perfect for the holidays!) by Charles Dickens, Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift, Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. For older students, there are more complex works, like Moby Dick, Metamorphosis and War and Peace. You can also find fiction works here other than the classics.

You can also do an advanced book search on the newly launched Google Books and download numerous titles in the public domain. All you do is mark that you are searching for titles that are “full view only” and your searches will bring up books that are available for download in their entirety. I found Great Expectations and The Jungle Book here in a casual search. Sony’s eBook store is also a good place to find free eBooks in the public domain.

Another good site is Free E-Book, where in my most recent searches I found books like The Red Badge of Courage, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and The Call of the Wild all available for free download.

Barnes & Noble also has some titles available for free if you happen to have the Nook. Take a look at the free Nook Books available. You may want to be careful though. A lot of them are harlequin romance novels that probably won’t give your child the right kind of education! There are some useful titles, though, like The Scarlet Letter and Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

By-line:

This guest post is contributed byAlisa Gilbert, who writes on the topics ofbachelors degree.  She welcomes your comments at her email Id:alisagilbert599@gmail.com.

Posted under Reading Curriculum, Social Studies Websites

Last Chance for the Iditarod – It starts Saturday!

March 5, 2009

dog_sled_s

If you’re looking for a fun idea for school these next couple weeks, try following the Iditarod Race which starts in two days – Saturday, Mar. 7th.

Learn about and follow the race at:

And don’t forget¬†the great E-Iditarod Project that starts every year in January and involves the kids making a map of Alaska, selecting a musher and team to follow, and¬†following the progress of their team on the race by posting to a blog as ‘their’ team reaches each checkpoint.¬† Here we are making our map of Alaska for the project:

drawing_map

Enjoy!

Posted under Homeschool Activities, Social Studies Websites

A Map of Alaska, the Iditarod Trail, and a Bedsheet – Fun Homeschool Unit Study.

January 26, 2009

Last month, we found the Iditarod Project (thanks, Beth!), and the kids have been having a blast working on it Рalways a great time in homeschool life.

The first activity is to make a map of Alaska and the Iditarod Trail.¬† After considering the daily danger to all fragile items in our boy and toddler-heavy¬†household, I wasn’t so excited about making a large paper map.¬† It didn’t take much imagination to see ripped map pieces, corners disolved by drool, and chunks of paint being pulled off the wall by tape gone crazy.

Good thing someone more creative than I suggested using a bedsheet to make the map. 

Whalah!  We did a quick math lesson on scale, made 8 x 8 inch squares out of cardstock, and the kids got busy marking a grid on the map in pencil.  (Hey, that laundry in the background is clean, at least)

drawing_map

The next day, we transfered the outline of Alaska, the rivers, the Iditarod Trail, and the cities.¬† After a discussion of map legends, my oldest designed a cool symbol for the cities, including one with a star in the middle for the capital.¬† (Since everyone has to be¬†involved at our house, the 3-year-old made his own unsupervised permanent marker line across the scale line – at least he didn’t get the carpet!)

legend

We outlined everything in permanent marker.  To remove the pencil marks, we washed the sheet with the regular mountains of laundry.  And finally, we hung the map proudly on the banister in our entryway.  (Who needs interior decorators when you homeschool?)

alaska_map

 

We’re also reading Dogsong by Gary Paulsen¬†together to get more of a feel for Alaska and some of her culture.

We’ll keep you posted on our progress.¬†

Meanwhile, check out these other homeschoolers who have also done/are doing the Iditarod project:

If you’re also joining in, post a comment and link about your progress and experiences!

Posted under Geography Websites, Homeschool Activities, Social Studies Websites

Ever wish you could run the Iditarod Dog Sled Race in Alaska?

January 3, 2009

A fellow homeschool friend Beth, pointed me to this great site:  The Iditarod Project.

It is aimed at helping students ‘virtually’ join in the famous Iditarod dog sled race held every year in Alaska.¬† If you don’t know much about the Iditarod, check out the official Iditarod website.¬† It is an amazing¬†race over 1150 miles long¬†across the rugged¬†Alaskan¬†wilderness¬†that takes around two weeks of grueling endurance to complete.¬† It’s history goes back to the routes the dog sleds took to bring supplies in from to coast to the mining towns in the interior.¬† There are even heroic stories of dog sled teams bringing medicines along these routes in time to save many lives.

All you need to participate in The Iditarod Project is be a public, private, or home school and join by January 9th.  The project includes the following activities:

  • study the trail and musher biographies
  • create a wall-sized map of the trail
  • select a musher to follow in this year’s race
  • track the selected musher’s progress as the race occurs
  • post to each checkpoint’s blog as the selected musher reaches each stop on the trail
  • complete the problem solving tasks you find at each checkpoint’s blog
  • arrive in Nome vicariously with your selected musher
  • receive an official 2008 eIditarod class certificate for completion of the trail!

We’ll be joining for the first time this year – let us know what team you choose!

Posted under Geography Websites, Social Studies Websites

LessonSense.com – Christmas Worksheets, Printables, Crafts and More!

December 18, 2008

LessonSense.com - free worksheets, crafts and printables

Check out another great internet resource full of craft projects, worksheets, and lots of printables: LessonSense.com.

If you’re looking for some Christmas¬†craft¬†ideas¬†and printables, see their Christmas¬†craft page for¬†projects to make¬†Christmas trees, stars, and even a cute stable with Mary and Joseph.¬†

Or check out their Christmas worksheet page which has the following:

Share With Us:

Have you incorporated holiday lessons into your homeschool? (Whichever holidays you celebrate)  Do you have any tips or ideas that might help the rest of us.  Please share by making a comment!

Posted under Homeschool Crafts, Social Studies Websites

Never too Young to Learn to Vote.

October 9, 2008

With politics everywhere you look today, what a great opportunity to discuss and teach about¬†the election, voting, democracy, women’s suffrage, The American Revolution, taxation without representation . . . ok, this is like the joke about how many homeschoolers it takes to screw in a light bulb:

One to hold the ladder while discussing stabilizing forces, one to check out a biography of Benjamin Franklin, one to analyze costs of turning on the light and the resulting monthly electricity bill, one to role play how to motivate the group effort . . .

Life is learning.¬† It’s really lots of fun, and not that hard ūüôā

Back to the vote.  Here are some fun resources:

  1. Inspired by memories of being taken to the voting booths by their own parents, Take Your Kids 2 Vote is an awesome website dedicated to helping instill the desire to participate and vote in our children.
  2. PBS Kids has a site about the process of voting and how important each vote is.¬† Also, if you’ve seen PBS’s show Zoom, check out this “Zoom out the Vote” page for more election learning and fun.
  3. For lots of great info and lesson plans find your local affiliate of Kids Voting USA.¬† If there isn’t one nearby, browse through some of the other websites on the page, most of the sites have a link to activites or lesson plans like these on Ohio’s Kids Voting USA site.¬†
  4. CurrClick¬†is having a mock election for kids.¬† They are a company that sells lots of high quality curriculum for decent prices and¬†is also¬†having specials on all their election time material.¬†¬†(Plus,¬†if you sign up for their email newsletter you’ll get a free downloadable product each week.)¬†
  5. Texas Public Schools have a “Project Vote” and have posted some of the curriculum here.¬† (It is around the 8th grade level)
  6. Washington State has a mock election and great election curriculum posted here that is sorted into three grade ranges.
  7. Finally, check out the National Student/Parent Mock Election for more great information on how to get involved.

(And for the parents who are looking to untangle all the rhetoric, I just discovered FactCheck.org, which seems to offer unbiased and referenced clarifications of the issues, voting records, and accusations on all sides.)

I hope you enjoy these resources.  Do you have any ideas on teaching children about the election process?  Please share with us in the comment section.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Posted under Social Studies Websites